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What health insurance do I need during pregnancy and birth?

You are covered by the public health insurance system – this applies to pregnancy, labour and the period immediately after the delivery.

This applies not only to EU citizens and their family relatives1 but also to third-country nationals with a permanent residence or asylum, international protection seekers and people under subsidiary protection as well as those with long term residence for the purpose of employment, employees of an employer based in the Czech Republic and people receiving maternity or parental allowance who are still employees are covered by the public health insurance system.

1.  For the purpose of health insurance, nonEU children and spouses or registered partners (in case of homosexual couples only) of EU citizens living in the Czech Republic also have right to enter the public health insurance system in case they fulfil a set of conditions. (For more details see our general guide on Health insurance.)

What health insurance system does our newborn baby have access to?

The type of the baby’s health insurance depends on the residential status of his / her parents, not the type of health insurance they have.

The baby will get accesses to the public health insurance system if at least one or both parents fit into one of the following profiles:

  • EU citizens working and doing business in the Czech Republic
  • EU citizens self employed and allowed to be in the public healthcare system based on their stay / address in the Czech Republic
  • a third country national with permanent residence
  • refugees or seekers of international protection.

The public health insurance assures full coverage from the moment the baby is born.

The baby is obliged to get commercial comprehensive/complex health insurance if both parents of the baby are third countries’ nationals with long-term residency. The baby will also get long-term residency and therefore no access to the public health insurance system. Unfortunately, even if the parents have access to the public healthcare insurance system (e.g.: the parents have long-term residency and are employed by a Czech company), their baby does not.

The baby’s comprehensive/complex insurance usually covers preventive check-ups and vaccinations as well as immediate care, but you should be aware of the fact that it always has some exclusions and limitations.

How and when should I get public health insurance for my baby?

As soon as the baby’s birth certificate is issued by the birth registry, the parents should bring their

  • ID cards/passports
  • residence cards (optional for EU citizens – they only bring their temporary residence certificate if they have ir, obligatory for their nonEU relatives or nonEU citizens)
  • health insurance cards

to the insurance company office and the baby’s insurance will be linked with one of the parent’s insurance.

Officially, the baby will be registered retroactively from the day he/she was born – first for the period of six months and then, once the baby’s residence has been granted (read more about this in our guide Having a baby – Immigration office), the baby will get a permanent registration.

Note: In case of foreign nationals whose residence has to be granted by the Immigration office (permanent residence, refugees, seekers), it is necessary to also bring a document from the Immigration office proving they have already applied for the residence of their baby (read more about this in our guide Having a baby – Immigration office).

How and when should I get commercial health insurance for my baby?

Although the actual commercial health insurance contract can only be signed once the baby is born, it is better to contact a chosen commercial health insurance company in advance and make sure they will accept the baby.

The health insurance contract has to be made for at least 12 months for children less than 1 year old and the cost of insurance for children aged 0 – 5 tends to be about 50 percent more than in case of comprehensive/complex insurance for an older child or an adult.

In order to be accepted as a client of an insurance company, the baby needs to be examined. It is important to note that between the moments the baby leaves the maternity hospital and is accepted by an insurance company, coverage of any healthcare expenses is up to the baby’s parents.

What health insurance do I need during pregnancy and birth?

You are most probably obliged to buy commercial health insurance, unless you are one of the cases listed in paragraph below.

EU citizens and their family relatives2 , third-country nationals with a permanent residence or asylum, international protection seekers and people under subsidiary protection as well as those with long term residence for the purpose of employment, employees of an employer based in the Czech Republic and people receiving maternity or parental allowance who are still employees are covered by the public health insurance system.

In all the remaining cases, foreigners living in the Czech Republic are obliged to buy commercial comprehensive/complex health insurance3.

It is recommended that once a woman finds out about her pregnancy, she should change the type of insurance to a different – more expensive – type of commercial insurance4  that covers the pregnancy, childbirth, and also the care for the new-born until the baby and the mother leave the maternity hospital5 .

When applying for this type of commercial health insurance, the mother will be asked to get general check-ups by a GP and a gynaecologist6. The results of the check-ups are then assessed by a doctor contracted by the insurance company who recommends (or not) to contract this new client. Women (potential future mothers) should also be aware of the fact that most types of comprehensive/complex insurances are conditioned by a waiting period (usually three months and eight months for pregnancy and delivery of the baby respectively)7. That is why buying a special insurance for the mother and her baby is not conditioned by such waiting periods, but it is more expensive.

If the mother has no insurance, if her type of insurance does not cover childbirth or if the costs exceed the sum guaranteed by the health insurance contract, the costs of both childbirth and post-birth care will have to be fully covered by the parent(s) of the baby.

Please, also note that – in case of mothers-to-be with commercial health insurance – most maternity hospitals require a written confirmation from their current health insurance company clearly stating the cost to which the labour (with possible complications) and the newborn baby (with possible special after-care needed) will be covered.

2. For the purpose of health insurance, nonEU children and spouses or registered partners (in case of homosexual couples only) of EU citizens living in the Czech Republic also have right to enter the public health insurance system in case they fulfil a set of conditions. (For more details see our general guide on Health insurance.)

3. Despite of its name – complex / comprehensive – this type of health insurance does not cover the full scope of services. It usually has a list of limitations and exceptions. The standard type of such insurance only covers pre-natal care and childbirth in specific cases varying from insurance company to insurance company.

4. There are a number of options offered by various insurance companies, they have to be contracted for at least twelve months and these are considerably more expensive (tens of thousands of crowns) than regular types of comprehensive / complex insurance.  From practice (price vs. coverage) we can recommend two types of such insurance: ´Novorozenec – Newborn´ in PVZP and ´Komplex 2´ in Uniqa. For more tips for health insurance companies to contact see our infotext on Health insurance.

5. Even here there are limitations as the care for the newborn is only covered up to a certain amount of money (exceeding costs have to be covered by the parents) and,  in case of complications during which the baby has to stay in the maternity hospital, usually only up to three months of the stay.

6. These check-ups are paid and are usually recommended to be done by contracted doctors. The expenses up to several hundred crowns are usually partially covered by the insurance company.

7. For example if  the mother buys a classic comprehensive / complex insurance and gets pregnant within the waiting period (3 months), the pregnancy is not covered, only the delivery. If, however, a woman buys such an insurance for two years and after one year she finds out she is pregnant, her and her baby will be taken care of during pregnancy and delivery without need to buy a more expensive health insurance.

What health insurance system does our newborn baby have access to?

The type of the baby’s health insurance depends on the residential status of his / her parents, not the type of health insurance they have.

The baby will get accesses to the public health insurance system if at least one or both parents fit into one of the following profiles:

  • EU citizens working and doing business in the Czech Republic
  • EU citizens self employed and allowed to be in the public healthcare system based on their stay / address in the Czech Republic
  • a third country national with permanent residence
  • refugees or seekers of international protection.

The public health insurance assures full coverage from the moment the baby is born.

The baby is obliged to get commercial comprehensive/complex health insurance if both parents of the baby are third countries’ nationals with long-term residency. The baby will also get long-term residency and therefore no access to the public health insurance system. Unfortunately, even if the parents have access to the public healthcare insurance system (e.g.: the parents have long-term residency and are employed by a Czech company), their baby does not.

The baby’s comprehensive/complex insurance usually covers preventive check-ups and vaccinations as well as immediate care, but you should be aware of the fact that it always has some exclusions and limitations.

How and when should I get public health insurance for my baby?

As soon as the baby’s birth certificate is issued by the birth registry, the parents should bring their

  • ID cards/passports
  • residence cards (optional for EU citizens – they only bring their temporary residence certificate if they have ir, obligatory for their nonEU relatives or nonEU citizens)
  • health insurance cards

to the insurance company office and the baby’s insurance will be linked with one of the parent’s insurance.

Officially, the baby will be registered retroactively from the day he/she was born – first for the period of six months and then, once the baby’s residence has been granted (read more about this in our guide Having a baby – Immigration office), the baby will get a permanent registration.

Note: In case of foreign nationals whose residence has to be granted by the Immigration office (permanent residence, refugees, seekers), it is necessary to also bring a document from the Immigration office proving they have already applied for the residence of their baby (read more about this in our guide Having a baby – Immigration office).

How and when should I get commercial health insurance for my baby?

Although the actual commercial health insurance contract can only be signed once the baby is born, it is better to contact a chosen commercial health insurance company in advance and make sure they will accept the baby.

The health insurance contract has to be made for at least 12 months for children less than 1 year old and the cost of insurance for children aged 0 – 5 tends to be about 50 percent more than in case of comprehensive/complex insurance for an older child or an adult.

In order to be accepted as a client of an insurance company, the baby needs to be examined. It is important to note that between the moments the baby leaves the maternity hospital and is accepted by an insurance company, coverage of any healthcare expenses is up to the baby’s parents.

General info

Having a baby is a very joyous event.

However, apart from regular medical check-ups and standard administrative procedures, becoming a parent in a foreign country creates a whole new list of obligations that need to be fulfilled before as well as after the baby is born.

That is why the parents (to be) should get in touch with a number of offices and familiarize with the procedures described in the answers above.